Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Wonderlust Benartex Blog Hop & Giveaway

Welcome to my stop on the Wonderlust Blog Hop for Benartex Fabrics! I am thrilled to have the chance to create something with Paula's incredible fabric. The 'prima donna' fabrics are like looking at stained glass, or tapestry, perhaps scrollwork, maybe all three! The 'solids' (anything but!) or blenders remind me of mixing colour into paint; they're saturated, prints with a depth and richness that makes me want to lick them, ha! I knew immediately that I would kaleidoscope these, something I haven't done for a long time, but that continues to call me.


I have loved and admired Paula Nadelstern's work for a very long time. I've mentioned before that I took a kaleidoscope course from a protégée of hers, Deb Tilley, at Earthly Goods in Edmonton back in 2000, and bought her book.

I had the privilege of hearing her presentation at the Edmonton Quilt Guild back in July 2004...
"REMEMBER, when it comes to fabric, more is MORE!"
First of all, this is not going to be a tutorial in how to make a kaleidoscope; for that you really need to either buy Paula's book and work through the detailed instructions to make one, or take a course from her. She is still teaching, around the world; in fact the main fabric, Tapestry, is inspired by a tower she saw in Muscat, Oman, before she taught in Dubai! Go to Sew in Love With Fabric, Benartex's blog, where you can read the full interview with Paula.

I'll show you the basics of what I did: I got to work, using my quilter's mirrors. The main fabric, Tapestry, was stunning. It, as well as another, Electric Slide, both have bi-lateral symmetry, meaning you could cut a triangle on the horizontal or vertical axis and have each side of the triangle identical. This creates the continuous kaleidoscope effect you see in the photos below, Tapestry in the first, and
Good Vibrations, both the centre triangles. I love the names! Another piece of Tapestry is the hexagonal shape below the triangle.


Beginning of kaleidoscope 2
In an attempt to speed up the process of creating a kaleidoscope, something which takes a long time, as you audition different fabrics and let the kaleidoscope find its own way, I tried something I haven't  done before in the construction of these, paper-piecing. (It is not as accurate as her method.) I did make templates for the symmetrical patches I needed though. I love paper-piecing for its accuracy, and thought for some of the sections it might work. I don't sew through the paper. You can find a detailed description of that process here.) For the purple kaleidoscope, you see the parts below:
This results in a 45° wedge shape.
Trimming, using the main template I drafted



Once you determine that the wedge is accurate (you can see where I needed to do a little finessing on mine) you then cut the rest of your pieces and assembly-line sew everything together. Once I had a second one and had tweaked it, I sewed the two together to get a right angle:
Getting excited as to what it will look like!
Here is the same stage of the second one:

This is what the templates and cutting looks like for the second kaleidoscope. The pentagon shapes are what I'd already cut for the first one.
Swiss cheese fabric... I still have a hard time with that! Plastic template has registration marks for accurately lining up the fabric
And after all the pieces for the both kaleidoscopes and the small hexagon, here is what's left of the yard of Tapestry!



Pretty soon you will have your kaleidoscope (centre seam hasn't been sewn because it hadn't told me it did not want to be a table runner but the star of its own show):

To get the octagon to a square shape, I laid it down on my cutting mat to determine the diameter, which was approximately 16.5" across. I then measured what I'd need for a corner, in my case about 5"on the two right angles sides, and cut a bit bigger of a square, two of them, so that I could cut in half across the diagonal and have four HSTs to add to the four corners:


From here, I added 2.5" strips to each of the four sides so that I had a 19.5 square.
I contemplated making a bag, with each one one side of the bag, but they said, no...cushions! Then you can see us every single day.

Both cushion tops complete
I layered the purple one and started quilting, first stitching in the ditch across the seams to anchor the piece and then FMQ-ing with Sulky Holoshimmer and metallic threads:


I was again (was there every a doubt?) very very pleased with the threads, and my darling Bernina, who sews wonderfully with these. I used Aurifil 50 wt in the bobbin at times and Superior The Bottom Line at others.

Here is the back before construction into the cushion cover:

And all done!



It is so hard to get a shot that shows the truly magnificent Sulky threads, glinting in the early morning sun, but I tried a few times...

A little different angle...

Here are the four Sulky threads I used, three Holoshimmer and one Metallic. The Metallic is used for the dot to dot work in the purple border, the Holoshimmer for the FMQ on the kaleidoscope.

The back where I used the Good Vibrations print:
I did the envelope back and machine stitched the binding to the front, then turned it to the back, gluing it down (love that) and stitched in the ditch from the front, catching the edge on the underside. This is my preferred way of machine-applying a binding as it most closely resembles my favourite, hand-stitching it to the back, and there are no lines of stitching showing on either the front or the back.
A close-up of my label😊

and another more detailed note inside!

Think I'm going to have tea with my cushion later today...

If you want something a wee bit simpler, and you just want to play with the symmetry of the fabric, you can make a one-patch hexagon using 60° triangles:

This will grow up into a nice-sized pincushion or a mug rug! Have no fear, the red kaleidoscope is under the Bernina's needle as I madly type, and I'll be sure to show you her when she's all done.

Quilt Stats:
Pattern:  original design kaleidoscope
Size: 19" square
Fabric:  'Wonderlust' by Paula Nadelstern for Benartex fabrics
Batting: Fairfield Soft n Crafty 80/20 (new to me and I liked it)
Quilted: on my Bernina
Threads:  pieced with Gütermann cotton; quilted with Sulky Holoshimmer and Metallic, ditch-stitched with Aurifil 2600; Aurifil 2600 and Superior The Bottom Line and Gütermann 6217 in the bobbin

Giveaway! THE GIVEAWAY HAS NOW CLOSED.
If you would like to win a fat quarter bundle of 8-10 of these fabulous fabrics, sent to US residents only please, due to postage costs, leave me a comment below, telling me if you've ever played with the kaleidoscope or perhaps the stack 'n whack methods. Followers of mine can have a second entry simply by telling me how you follow me. New followers welcome! Deadline is Saturday, February 3 at 7:00 am EST. I'll announce the winner on my Saturday post which has the details of the 30 Designs Challenge I'm hosting again this year on Instagram. Please remember to include your email address if you are a no-reply blogger.

The winner was #108 Janine! She has been notified by email.

There are multiple opportunities to win. I hope you will visit the other bloggers throughout this week, as well as visit Benartex's blog, Sew in Love With Fabric, and maybe download their beautiful free digital e-zine, 😉 Modern By the Yard.
Monday: Sew in Love With Fabric (interview with Paula and a look at the Wonderlust line)
Tuesday: Sarah Goer Quilts
Wednesday: mmm! quilts (you are here!)
Thursday: Little Bunny Quilts
Friday: Stitched Together Studios

Tomorrow is the opening for registration for the New Quilt Bloggers Hop! If your blog is more than 2 months old but less than 3 years, I'd highly recommend signing up for this most worthwhile event, of which I am pleased and honoured to be a co-host this year. As a result, Throwback Thursday will be moved this month to Friday.
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153 comments:

  1. That is amazing fabric and your technique fascinated me! It was fun to follow along as you created your cushions. I've never tried anything like that at all. Thanks for the great giveaway!

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  2. I have tried stack and whack but, lost interest. Maybe because that fabric could not compete with the giveaway

    sharongalli@gmail.com

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  3. I follow via bloglovin
    sharongalli@gmail.com

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  4. I follow by email mumbird3(at)gmail(dot)com

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  5. All I can say is WOW! you make it look easy and the results are fantastic. I have done some stack and whacking but you take it to a much higher level!!! Amazing - those fabrics are dynamite so vivid and bright!!! Love them!!! I have a few hoarded pieces of Paula's fabrics (buried deep in the stash!) that I have been saving - I need to get them out and try this!!! The pillow looks gorgeous!!! Thanks for the inspiration!!! mumbird3(at)gmail(dot)com

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  6. Wow - these are spectacular. I've always been totally intimidated by kaleidoscope blocks, so I've never attempted one. But, wow... beautiful.

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  7. I am now a follower at longhornkjm at yahoo...

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  8. Oh, Sandra, how truly magnificent! You’ve certainly raised the bar for this hop! I’ve made one little kaleidoscope block, just to try it out. Now it lives in my bin. Maybe someday I’ll add to it! As gorgeous as this fabric is, don’t enter me in the give away. I’m overwhelmed as it is! XO

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  9. Wow. The blocks are amazing and I can't wait to see the orange block completed (orange is one of my favorite colors). Thank you very much for sharing your work with us and inspiring us to try something new.

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  10. What a cool pillow! Those fabrics are amazing. The only type of stack and whack that I've done are Buggy Barn quilts and my own version of slice and dice. haha.

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  11. Very pretty pillow! And the quilting you did is exquisite! I've never tackled making a stack and whack or kaleidoscope quilt. Using a quilting mirror was perfect.
    kthurn(at)bektel(dot)com

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  12. Your blog posts are delivered by email when you publish. Very handy!
    kthurn(at)bektel(dot)com

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  13. Love this fabric. I've done the stack and whack method but nothing at this level of detail. Your cushions are amazing

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  14. As a beginner quilter, I have not tried this yet! Love the mirror tip- love,love these quilts-the colors are amazing! Thank you for sharing, Susan

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  15. I've never tried to do that, but it sure looks like fun!

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  16. I follow you by email! Thank you, Susan

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  17. I follow with newsletter and blogluvin.

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  18. I have played with it. It all comes down to beautiful fabric doesn't it? This is beautiful fabric.

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  19. Wow, wow, wow!!! Gorgeous quilt. I've not done much fussy cutting...YET.

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  20. Paula spoke at our guild many years ago. I have used-and love-her fabrics but not in a Kaleidoscope quilt. I've also done a Stack-n-Whack. I'm signing up for your emails.
    Thanks for all the detailed pix.

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  21. I have tried SAW and it is a UFO. I am going to go dig for it this morning and see what shape it is in. Maybe even finish it!

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  22. Lovely block and the fabric is to die for! I bought some large print fabric to make a kaleidoscope block but it is still in my to do list.

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  23. Excellent explanations for those of us who never have done either method! Thank you. And I follow you every way possible, but blogposts by email. I'm glad these finished so beautifully.

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  24. I have always liked kaleidoscopes, never had the right fabric. This seems like a wonderful fabric collection to make them with. 24Tangent@gmail.com

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  25. Following on Bloglovin'. 24Tangent@gmail.com

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  26. What a great discussion of the steps you went through to create the lovely cushions. I've tried Stack and Whack and it was okay. I like that you tried this with paper piecing which I think is quite accurate. Enjoy your column all the time.

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  27. I follow you through email. Can't wait to start Postcards from Sweden.

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  28. Thanks for sharing so many fascinating details! I've never made a quilt using this process, and I'm intrigued. Clearly a lot of work and thought goes into it.

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  29. Your blocks are amazing! Just started EPP a couple months ago, and am having a fabulous time fussy cutting to make those beautiful secondary designs.

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  30. Your pillows are just stunning. I have always thought Paula's fabrics are just beautiful. I would love to take a class from her some time. I have made one stack and whack quilt. It was very enjoyable. This is the first time I have seen your blog, but I will become a follower. I really enjoyed your instructions.

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  31. Very awesome blocks. So nice. I've not tried yet, but I definitely want to try this. Have a great day! angielovesgary2 atgmail dotcom

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  32. I follow you by email. angielovesgary2 atgmail dotcom

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  33. I have never tried either of these techniques. Your blocks are fantastic.

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  34. Out of this world beautiful ❤️❤️❤️ This fabric is amazingly gorgeous. I’m in frozen Alberta so no entry for me.

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  35. I follow you on my Blogger's reading list.

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  36. Too far away in NZ, but what a fab give-away, and the fabric and the design, your covers are gorgeous.

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  37. There is more than one pattern with the name Kaleidoscope, you know. OK< I have not tried this type of Kaleidoscope - the one block wonder kind. But the Queen's Necklace and Esmerlada are also called Kaleidoscope (a different kind).
    Now, about your kaleidoscope blocks - well, they are absolutely drop dead gorgeous. And if I try NOT to understand the process, then it is magical!!! And that is where I am - Magically Melony Kaleidoscope. Howzzat!!!!

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  38. What a fabulous concept. Thanks for sharing! Would love to win the fabric. marciinidaho@yahoo.com

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  39. I have admired kaleidoscope projects with an intention of trying this technique one day. Your work is wonderful. You made it look easy but I just admired the finished project along the way. I have admired Paula Nadelstern's fabrics and work for some time. Just beautiful.

    tushay3 (at) yahoo (dot) com

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  40. I have made a kaleidoscope quilt but not with this type of fabric and have also made a stack and whack matching the layers of fabric. Gorgeous fabrics and your pillow is beautiful-love the "sparkly".

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  41. I have made a stack and whack type of block. They never made it into a quilt though. Lovely project you made.

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  42. Those are beautiful! I have long admired Paula's technique, and have actually made a quilt for a guild challenge with her fabrics making a mariners star, and two other stars. It turned out great and is one of my favorite quilts. It hangs in my bedroom. Thanks for sharing the giveaway!!

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  43. I am a follower via Bloglovin.

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  44. I have played with stack n wack and OBW. I am lucky to have 2 quilts in the newest OBW book. I’ve also used Jinny Beyer’s techniques with her border fabrics. It seems like this might be my next challenge.

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  45. I’ve never tried this technique yet but I watched sewing with Nancy and it was so cool! I love all the ways you can mix and match to make a new block. Your pillow is gorgeous! Thanks for a chance!

    tdkcarpenoctem2@gmail.com

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  46. I follow you on Instagram, email and Pinterest!

    tdkcarpenoctem2@gmail.com

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  47. I saw Paula’s quilts at the Folk Art Museum when my daughter was living in Brooklyn, NY. I loved looking at her quilts and always know when I see her fabrics. Your pillow top is beautiful.
    Scott_3508@netins.net

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  48. I love your pillow! I have made a kaleidoscope quilt back when I first started quilting about 6 years ago. After seeing your pillow, I want to make more. Thanks for sharing your projects.

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  49. Beautiful fabric! I love the pillows you made. I have made a stack n whack. Used a fall leaves fabric and use it every year on my dining room table. ckrutjo at g mail dot com

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  50. I following you by e-mail. ckrutjo at g mail dot com

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  51. I took a class with the fussy cut method for a table topper--had the swiss cheese holes left in the fabric also!
    barbkaup(at)(yahoo)(dot)(com)


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  52. I am signed up to follow you by e-mail--Love your pillows!
    barkaup(at)(yahoo)(dot)(com)

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  53. WOW! What can I say! Your pillows are truly awesome! They are sooo beautiful.
    No, I have never made anything like this--no stack n whack or kaleidoscope blocks. It looks too complicated for me to attempt.

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  54. This work is
    amazing! I
    haven't used
    either method.
    Carla from Utah

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  55. I do follow
    by email.
    Carla from Utah

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  56. Sandra, don't include me in the giveaway - I have too much going on in the sewing room just now. But I wanted to tell you how gorgeous these are. You used that fabric to the fullest. Stunning!

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  57. tried stack and whack but it didn't look like that!

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  58. Wow, your projects are amazing! I have done both kaleidoscopes and stack 'n whacks, but it's been years ago. Paula designs the most gorgeous fabrics for those techniques.

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  59. I follow on my blogger dashboard/GFC.

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  60. WOW!! Both for the fabric and your use of it. I am in awe and quite green with envy.

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  61. I may be your newest follower. I would love to have a chance (or two) to win. Thank you.

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  62. Have never played with a kaleidoscope design. Looks like the perfect fabric to inspire and give it a go!
    basaran.family@rogers.com

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  63. I subscribe to your blog by email.
    basaran.family@rogers.com

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  64. I follow Your blog by email!
    Susie

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  65. I have not tried either of these methods, but what spectacular results!! Wow!
    kakingsbury at verizon dot net

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  66. I did a one block wonder that used the stack n whack style with eight layers. No two blocks were the same. Each was wow, look at this one! And this one and so on. Amazing all the variations! Thanks for sharing and the opportunities

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  67. Wow you have a very inspirational post. Everything looked so beautiful. I have done stack and whack before. Thank you for sharing. Enjoy your pillow.

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  68. That pillow looks amazing in the sun there!

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  69. Not here for the win as outside the US, and I hope you know I love your work all the time anyway. But still felt compelled to say what a beautiful project and a great fabric showcase. I bought two of Paula's books very early on in my quilting journey, and have always thought I'd love to do a Paula style kaleidoscope "one day". Now is not the time yet either, due to being busy busy, but I should certainly put a cushion like yours on my more doable wish list. Congrats on your lovely post.

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  70. I've played with the stack-n-whack method once but I wasn't successful. Would love to try it again!

    Sandy A

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  71. I have used the stack n whack method, but never tried the kaleidoscope. Your pillow is beautiful!

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  72. I have tried stack and whack but never finished the project, I have a group of 12 blocks waiting for sashing. Your cushions turned out great.

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  73. I admire your beautiful work. I haven't tried any type of kaleidoscope work.

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  74. I have been following your blog with email.

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  75. I have never used the stack and whack method. I love your pillow!

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  76. You did a phenomenal job with this one! Beautiful choice to show off the stunning fabrics! I have not yet tried a kaleidoscope or similar method. I will have to add it to my to-do list. Maybe I'll look for a class.

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  77. That cushion is stunning! I always enjoy seeing quilts made with these methods, but I've never tried it. Maybe one day! :)

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  78. There was a time when I wanted to make one of these quilts, and still have fabric suitable. Maybe this will re-spark my interest! Thanks for sharing such lovely work on Midweek Makers

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  79. I am so inspired by your work, Sandra! I have a book on stack n whack and have always wanted to give it a go, but it gets pushed back on my to-do list. I really love the idea and need to push it up the list! I even have a few fabric pieces that would work well with this technique.

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  80. I am a happy Bloglovin' and IG follower of yours!

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  81. Years ago I took a class with Paula.

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  82. I've never made a kaleidescope or stack and whack quilt, but this beautiful fabric and your stunning pillow are inspiring me to do one. Thanks for the inspiring post!

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  83. I follow on Bloglovin and Instagram. (I have a US address)

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  84. I I follow you on Instagram. Thanks again for the chance to win!

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  85. Yes! I have tried a couple of kaleidoscopes . . . failed miserably. . . . tried again, and again, and . . . threw the whole bit in the rubbish! Glad yours were successful; they are lovely!

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  86. Follow you via EMail. Have tried Bethany Reynolds Magic Stack 'n Whack. Enjoyed what I created. Now I'm intrigued by your paper piecing method. I think I'll give that a try. Thanks!!

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  87. I think Paula was just beginning to put forth her kaleidoscope method about the time I started quilting. I remember giving her idea a try, and have also (a WIP) kaleidoscope project that is well aged. I've done a stack-and-whack project too (another aging WIP).

    Lovely ideas, and I think new cushions are in the not too distant future.

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  88. The precision in this just boggles my mind. The fabric, your designing and piecing and the metallic thread--all amazing! Thank you for all of the close up photos so we can see all the details shimmering in the sunshine. The cushion looks like it was made for a royal garden. Oh. That's your garden. Well, you are the queen of blogland this week with all you have going on, so it's perfectly appropriate. I seem to remember working on a very small kaleidoscope project many years ago, but I'm sure it was very simple.

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  89. I follow you on Blogland, but really, mostly by e-mail. :)

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  90. I have played with Kaleidoscopes! I found Paula Nadelstern's Kaleidoscope book at my local library several years ago when I was just getting into quilting. I drew my templates using drafting rulers & a protractor, & purchased some Liberty of London bilaterally symmetrical fabric & had at it! Then a few years later I signed up for a class with Paula at Quilt Colorado & found I didn't need the protractor after all--just some good graph paper to go with the rulers! Lots of FUN!

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  91. I follow you on IG & I signed up for your emails.

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  92. I love your pillows. The fabrics are fantastic and your quilting adds wonderful texture.
    I have tried stack and wack but my fabric wasn’t as inspirational as yours!

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  93. Wow, I've never tried anything like this before. I'll have to check out Paula Nadelstern's book. These Benartex fabrics are gorgeous. Thank for sharing. grinnie1961 at gmail dot com

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  94. I follow on Bloglovin. grinnie1961 at gmail dot com

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  95. Absolutely gorgeous--love what you did with the fabrics! I have never tried a kaleidoscope or stack and whack, but seeing your work makes me want to! Thanks for sharing!

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  96. I haven't tried either of those methods but I am always ready to learn new things.

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  97. I've made one kaleidoscope quilt (paper-pieced) but not as elaborate as yours. This fabric collection is spectacular and your sample piece is beautiful. Thanks for the giveaway opportunity.

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  98. Oooooohhhhh! So so so gorgeous! I can see why these fabrics absolutely captivated you, Sandra! Your cushion is amazing, just wonderful. Sigh.

    Since I won't be in the US for your giveaway, please don't include me in the drawing this time around. Some other lucky soul will get these fabrics :)

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  99. Oh. My. Goodness! Those are beautiful. I've been fascinated with kaleidoscopes since I was a small child. I had that book and lost it in a house fire. I've tried some one block wonders and want to branch out into more involved kaleidoscopes. PN's fabrics are truly amazing. After seeing your creations, I'm going to have to order some of my own. Thank you for the stunning inspiration!

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  100. I follow you on e-mail. Always look forward to your posts--I enjoy your yoga for sewists as well as quilting projects and your scenery. Thank you for a fun blog!

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  101. Your work is a absolutely amazing! Can it even be called work because it looked like a whole lot of fun to me? So to answer your question, I've not made a kaleidoscope yet as I've just started quilting and it looked pretty complex to me. But I love, love, love Judy's new collection and following your steps (or a different tutorial) it might be possible - doubt mine will look as fabulous as yours though.

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  102. I'm following you via e-mail.

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  103. love your pillows. I have only sewn the one block wonder blocks (have still to sew them into a quilt). Nancy A: rangerer@sbcglobal.net

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  104. I am a new follower -- by email. Nancy A: rangerer@sbcglobal.net

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  105. i have always wanted to try kaleidoscopes or stack and whack but haven't had the nerve yet.

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  106. I've never done either of those methods.

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  107. Awesome technique to make your pillow. As a kid I played with a Kaleidoscope but haven't put it into use with a quilt yet. rozz01(at)cox(dot)net

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  108. I signed up to follow you by your newsletter. rozz01(at)cox(dot)net

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  109. I love your pillow! What a great pattern AND great fabrics. I can’t believe I am going to meet Paula in a few weeks! And I really thought I commented yesterday - my bad. I am impressed with the intricacies of the pattern and your work on this. The holoshimmer thread is really fun on it. My Bernina is mostly happy with threads and needs very few adju Congratulations on these beauties.

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  110. I recently picked up the Kaleidoscope book at a sale. I have yet to try anything from it. I have done several whack and stack quilts and I was thinking these fabrics would work well

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  111. I love Paula’s Fabrics but don’t know how to use then. Fortunately I just purchased Fabracadabra so I’m on the right path. I did purchase the green “Solid” from this line and am using it to make trees for Elizabeth Hartman’s Legendary (Bigfoot) pattern. It is swirly and makes great trees. I also did a little stank n whack when Bethany Reynolds wrote her book.

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  112. I think I have some of her fabric I wanted to make a One Block Wonder, or a Stack and Whack. Love the pillow and the sulky threads are wonderful.

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  113. I have done one kaleidoscope but my center was a disaster - I covered it with a circle applique. I need to try again now that I have a few years of quilting experience under my belt.

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  114. That is a genuine work of art, or I should say work of heart! Gorgeous! I've fussy cut before, but nothing like this.

    https://prayersformymom.blogspot.com/

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  115. Following you on Bloglovin'.

    https://prayersformymom.blogspot.com/

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  116. Wow, Sandra! These are stunning! I've never done a kaleidescope quilt...I think I'd have a hard time with the swiss cheese aspect of it too :)

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  117. Gorgeous purple pillow. I have an unfinished stack 'n' whack using a Paula Nadelstern fabric actually. I've also done some more simplified four patch kaleidoscopes. Easier to sew but not as intricate a design. I saw a Paula exhibit at the Houston Quilt Festival several years ago and listened in while she explained her technique. I also have the book and some of her earlier fabrics.
    Pat

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  118. What a gorgeous pillow! No, I haven't tried the stack 'n' wack method nor have I made I kaleidoscope quilt. I think it's time I try one.
    nikilsend(at)outlook(dot)com

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  119. I'm an e-mail subscriber!
    nikilsend(at)outlook(dot)com

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  120. I love that you cut apart the kaliedoscopes and made them your own!! That is the idea that Paula wants folks to try!

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  121. Haven't done this method before, love that purple.

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  122. you are on my reading list in blogger.

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  123. I've never tried this but it's so beautiful. ljgibeault@winstream.net

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  124. You are on my reader list but I use a google profile. ljgibeault@windstream.net

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  125. I have never tried either technique. On my list of quilting want Tom's....

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  126. the kaleidoscope method really does play all sorts of visual games, especially when the fabric is so rich

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  127. Awesomeness!! I can imagine how very beautiful the threads are, having used some a couple of times. It's really just impossible to get the camera to do them justice, isn't it? I hadn't seen kaleidoscopes done so intricately - only a single 1/6 or 1/8 patch cut in multiples. This is truly amazing. I'm going to look for her book.

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